Collierville Police will be participating is unwanted prescription program

On October 22nd, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Collierville Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public its 12th opportunity in six years to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to CPD, located at 156 North Rowlett in Collierville. (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.) The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Collierville Police Promotes Child Passenger Safety Week

The Collierville Police Department is partnering with the Tennessee Highway Safety Office (THSO) to promote Child Passenger Safety Week beginning September 18 and ending on National Seat Check Saturday, September 24. The week is dedicated to teaching parents and caregivers the importance of correct installation and proper use of car seats, booster seats, and seat belts. Parents will also be reminded the importance of registering car seats with the manufacturer, so they can receive notification in the event of a recall.


NASHVILLE –Chris Locke, Captain with the Collierville Police Department was among fourteen law enforcement officers from across Tennessee who were graduated from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Leadership Academy this month. This is the third class to go through the Leadership Academy.

Don't be a victim of a vehicle burglary

Over the past couple of weeks, the Collierville Police Department responded to calls where automobiles had been burglarized.  Our initial investigation has revealed that in just about every incident, the vehicles had items in plain view that would tempt a thief.  These incidents have occurred at various locations around town.

Career or Calling? Collierville’s Female Police Officers Talk

Sometimes you choose a job; sometimes it chooses you.

Officers Kimbrell and Fitts

Collierville Police Officer Summer Fitts talks about how she decided on a career in law enforcement:

"When I enrolled at the University of Memphis, my plan was to major in psychology. Then I took an introductory course in criminal justice. I knew after that first class that law enforcement was the career for me."

For other female members of Fitts’ police "family", the desire was already there. Madison Kimbrell and Amy Dabaldo both wanted a career where they would be doing something to help people on a daily basis. "I consider it a calling; there is nothing else I’ve ever thought about doing," said Dabaldo. Kimbrell said it’s about serving the community. She said talking with people on her daily patrol is where she learns exactly how to do that. "It could be something as simple as listening to someone who just needs to talk," she said.